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URL: https://coinhistory.info/canada/

References are numbered in [brackets], which are listed here. A number after the dot gives the page in the source.

1988

January 14

  • A Royal proclamation specifies the design of the 1988 $1 silver coin and the $1 bronze-plated nickel coin. The silver dollar commemorates the 250th anniversary of the first industrial refinery in Canada, the Saint-Maurice Ironworks. The nickel dollar continues the loon design. [455.1081]

(month unknown)

  • A panel of judges in Krause Publications’ 1986 Coin of the Year contest votes Canada’s 1986 silver dollar first place in Best Silver Coin, and Best Crown categories. [740.1]

April

  • Empire Auction of Montreal, Quebec, sells a 1911 silver pattern dollar for $450,000 to dealer Sandy Campbell of Nova Scotia, for a private collector. [121.20] [340.1] [742.1]

April 28

  • A Royal proclamation specifies that the design of the 1988 $100 gold coin mark the protection of the bowhead whale. [456.2521]

June 17

  • Prior to the Torex coin show auction in Toronto, Ontario, RCMP seize a nickel 50-cent coin with the reverse of a Canadian 1981 $100 gold coin. The Royal Canadian Mint had informed the RCMP that the piece to be auctioned had been illegally produced at the Mint. [744.1] [745.11] (July 17 [1185.38)

June 30

  • The Finance Minister announces the government will stop issuing $1 bills on June 30, 1989. [67.561] [288.A1] [785.25]

July 11

  • The government announces that the Royal Canadian Mint will produce platinum and silver Maple Leaf bullion coins in 1989. [63.3847] [70.2] [381.25] (July 12 [67.561])

July 22

  • At the ANA convention in Cincinnatti, Ohio, Royal Canadian Mint’s mint master Lafontaine unveils the 1988 $100 gold coin, depicting a bowhead whale designed by Robert Ralph Carmichael. [746.1] [747.6]

September 1

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins sales of the 1988 $100 1/4-ounce gold coin depicting a Bowhead whale, designed by Robert-Ralph Carmichael. Diameter 27mm; mintage limit 95,000; issue price CDN$210. [1184.1704]

September 22

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins production of a 0.9999 fine Silver Maple Leaf bullion coin, with face value of $5. [47] [70.2] [382.17] [748.1] [1057.40] [1082.56]
  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins production of 0.9995 fine Platinum Maple Leaf bullion coins, with the following weights and face values: 1 ounce ($50), 1/2 ounce ($20), 1/4 ounce ($10), 1/10 ounce ($5). [47] [70.2] [382.17] [748.1]

November 4

  • The Master of the Royal Canadian Mint presents a 1988 $100 gold commemorative coin to Commandant Jacques-Yves Cousteau in France. [70.4]

November 10

  • A Royal proclamation specifies that the design of the 1989 silver $1 coin commemorate Sir Alexander Mackenzie’s discovery of the Mackenzie River. [457.4925]

November 17

  • The Royal Canadian Mint officially launches the silver ($5) and platinum ($5, $10, $20, $50) Maple Leaf coins in six cities. (In the first six weeks, 1,062,000 troy ounces of silver and 64,200 troy ounces of platinum coins are sold.) [70.2] [226.B8] [254.175] [369.29] [752.1] [755.1]

December 7

  • A Royal proclamation specifies that the design of the $100 gold coin commemorate the 350th anniversary of the first European settlement at Sainte-Marie (Ontario). [458.25]

1989

February 22

  • The Royal Canadian Mint unveils the design for the 1989 $1 silver coin, commemorating the bicentennial of the discovery of the Mackenzie River by European explorers. Issue price is $21.95 Proof, $16.25 uncirculated. [751.1]

February 27

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins sales of the 1989 gold $100 commemorating the 350th anniversary of the founding of Sainte-Marie Among the Hurons. Design of the coin was created by David Craig. Weight 13.338 grams, 1/4 ounce gold, 27mm diameter, mintage limit 65,000, issue price $245. [751.1] [1186.693]

March 26

  • In Montreal, the Empire Rare Coin Auction is held. An 1875-H Proof set (5c, 10c, 25c) is sold for $44,000. [750.1] [754.1]

April 20

  • The Canadian Bank Note Company prints the last batch of Canadian $1 bills. [169.893] [785.25] (April 30 [184])

June 22

  • A Royal proclamation, effective January 2, 1990, specifies that the obverse design of the following coins be changed to the design of the Queen by Dora de Pedery-Hunt: $50 gold, $20 gold, $10 gold, $5 gold, $50 platinum, $20 platinum, $10 platinum, $5 platinum, $5 silver. [459.3324]

June 26

  • The effigy of Queen Elizabeth II for all coins is updated (for 1990), showing a portrait designed by a Canadian, for the first time. [64.402] [71.2]

June 27

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins striking 1990-dated coins for circulation, with the new portrait of Queen Elizabeth II, designed by Canadian Dora de Pedery-Hunt. Circulating dollar coins are the first struck. [228.A1]

June 30

  • The Bank of Canada stops issuing one dollar notes. [49.9] [118.1] [261.44]

July 21

  • A 12-foot high replica of a 1908 gold sovereign, Canada’s first gold coin, is unveiled in Virginiatown, Ontario. [138.1]

August 9

  • At the ANA’s convention in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, $1 million worth of 1911 to 1952 Canadian Proof and Specimen silver dollar coins are on exhibit, over three days. [760.8]

August 12

  • The American Numismatic Association presents a Medal of Merit Award to the Royal Canadian Mint. [71.4]

September 5

  • The Royal Canadian Mint issues a collector’s edition Gold Maple Leaf coin, commemorating the 10th anniversary of issuing the bullion coins. [71.2] [83.1] [152.19]

September 11

  • In New York City, New York, Bowers and Merena hold an auction of The Kissel and Victoria Collection of Canadian and Provincial Coins. A “superb Uncirculated” 1921 50c piece sells for US$110,000. A second 1921 50c coin grading MS-60 sells for US$37,500. [119.19] [760.8] [767.8]

September 17

  • RCMP officers seize three 1967 $1 “diving goose” double struck coins from J&M; Numismatic Auction, based on information from the Royal Canadian Mint that they coins were deliberately and illegally created at the Mint. (The coins are returned in April 1990.) [765.1]

October 7

  • CBC TV debuts the Street Cents TV show, focusing on coin collecting, targeting young people. [1187.64]

October 17

  • The Minister of Supply and Services purchases 4,000 shares in the Royal Canadian Mint, for $10,000 per share. [71.2]

October 27

  • The Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) begins grading Canadian coins. [767.21] [1087.72]

November 2

  • A Royal proclamation specifies that the design of the $1 silver coin commemorate the 300th anniversary of Henry Kelsey’s voyager of exploration of the Canadian prairies. [460.4717]

November 7

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins selling the Maple Leaf gold bullion coin in Malaysia. [71.2] [48.21]

December 7

  • In New York, Stack’s holds its auction of Ancient and Foreign Gold, Silver, and Copper Coins, over two days. A 1921 50c in BU grade sells for a record US$57,200. [768.4]

1990

January 1

  • Effective this day, any new coins struck feature the portrait of Queen Elizabeth II designed by Dora de Pedery-Hunt. [152.18] [758.1]

January 16

  • A Royal proclamation specifies that the design of the $100 gold coin mark the International Year of Literacy. [461.501]

January 26

  • The Royal Canadian Mint announces the theme of the commemorative silver dollar coin for 1990. The coin will commemorate the 300th anniversary of Henry Kelsey’s exploration of the Canadian prairies. [300]

February 1

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins sales of the 1990 $100 14-karat 1/4-ounce gold coin, celebrating the United Nations International Literacy Year. The coin, designed by John Mardon, depicts a native Inuit woman teaching a child to write. Weight 13.338 grams, diameter 26.9mm, mintage limit 60,000, issue price is $210. [72.2] [82.1] [299] [1188.1393]

March 31

  • In New York City, New York, Auctions by Bowers and Merena holds an auction of Canadian coins. Some highlights in rough Canadian dollars:
    • 5 cents 1872-H SP-67: $10,000;
    • 5 cents 1881-H SP-67: $10,000;
    • 10 cents 1901: $10,000;
    • 50 cents 1872-H MS-64 Proof: $28,500;
    • 50 cents 1904: $15,000;
    • 50 cents 1908 Gem: $20,000.
    [82.16] [770.25]

April

  • Two 1967 “diving goose” $1 coins are returned by the RCMP to J&M; Numismatic Auction owner Joe Iorio. The coins had been confisticated last September. The RCMP decided there was a possibility that the coins had been legitimately made by accident at the Mint. [771.1]

July 1

  • Dollar coins with the new de Pedery-Hunt effigy are presented to the Queen. [72.2]

July 27

  • A Royal proclamation specifies that the designs of the following coins have the respective images: $200 gold with multinational children; $300, $150, $75, and $30 platinum with polar bears; $20 silver with Harvard aircraft and Anson aircraft and cameo of Robert Leckie; $20 silver with Lancaster aircraft and cameo of John Fauquier. [462.3504]

August 11

  • Auction ’90 numismatic auction is held in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Some Canadian coin highlights:
    • 5 cents 1921 MS-65: US$30,800;
    • 25 cents 1875-H Specimen-67: US$41,800;
    • 50 cents 1921 in MS-65: US$60,500.
    [124.4]

August 22

  • At the ANA convention in Seattle, the auction is conducted by Heritage Numismatic Auctions. Some highlights:
    • 10 cents 1893 round-top ‘3’ PCGS MS-64: US$15,000;
    • 10 cents 1902 SP-67: US$10,000.
    [790.17] [119.16]

August

  • The Royal Canadian Mint unveils designs for a set of four platinum coins featuring polar bears. Face values of the coins are $30 (1/10 ounce), $75 (1/4 ounce), $150 (1/2 ounce), and $300 (1 ounce). The designs were created by Robert Bateman. Mintage limit is set at 3500 sets. [120.1] [72.2] (September [262.23])

September 12

  • In New York City, Bowers and Merena conduct the auction of the Robert W. Rusbar Collection. Some Canadian coin highlights:
    • 50 cents 1921 MS-64: US$67,000;
    • $10 1910 Gem Specimen-68: US$34,100.
    [118.4] [124.4] [771.17]

September 15

  • A new series of sterling silver $20 coins with gold cameo features is introduced, the Powered Flight in Canada / The First Fifty Years coin series. The first two coins are issued. One coin, designed by Robert Ralph Carmichael, features a Lancaster 638 Avro bomber and John Farquier. The other coin, designed by Geoff Bennett, features Harvard and Anson planes and Air Marshall Robert Leckie. Issue price of the Proof coins is $52, with mintage limited to 50,000 each. [72.2] [118.1] [661.290]

October

  • The Royal Canadian Mint issues the first coin of a series of five $200 22K gold coins, the first featuring the Canadian flag and children. The design was created by Stewart Sherwood. Issue price is $395, with mintage limited to 25,000. [72.2] [118.4] [262.23]

(month unknown)

  • Mark Hyder, a landscape student in Vancouver, British Columbia, informs the Royal Canadian Mint that the 1-cent coin shows one leaf growing from the stem of another leaf, which is not how maple leaves grow. Maple leaves grow in pairs from a common point on the twig. [811.23]

December 20

  • A Royal proclamation specifies that the design of the $100 gold coin commemorate the 100th anniversary of the launch of the first Canadian Pacific Steamship, and that the design of the $1 silver coin commemorate the 175th anniversary of the launch of the first steamboat to operate on Lake Ontario. [463.783]
1842-1889 1890-1919 1920-1939 1940-1959 1960-1964 1965-1969 1970-1974 1975-1976 1977-1978 1979-1981
1982-1984 1985-1987 1988-1990 1991-1992 1993-1995 1996-1997 1998-1999 2000-2001 2002-2003 2004
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011-end

 

A list of references to all source material is available.

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