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URL: https://coinhistory.info/cannclt/

This document is an attempt to bring various published sources together to present a timeline about Canadian NCLT Coins.

References are numbered in [brackets], which are listed here. A number after the dot gives the page in the source.

1965

May

  • Finance Minister Walter Gorden confirms that a gold centennial coin would be given considerable attention for 1967. [142.1]
May 25

  • A new mint facility of the Royal Canadian Mint is established in Hull, Quebec, for striking collector coins. [661.xxix] [683.22] [733.13] [922.27]
October 26

  • Finance Minister Walter Gorden announces that a $20 gold coin will be struck for Canada’s Centennial in 1967, for inclusion in a special coin set. [285] [362.484] [1027.60] (October 25 [922.27]) (November [142.4]) (1966 May 6 [45.12] [364.329] [1005.44] [1006.22])

1967

January 2

  • A Proclamation authorizes a $20 gold coin, in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of Confederation. [202]
(month unknown)

  • Canada’s first $20 gold piece is struck, intended only for use in sets of coins that year. This is the first legal tender Canadian coin struck solely for sale above face value, without corresponding business strikes for circulation. [661.244]

1971

March 10

  • The Finance Minister announces that a silver dollar will be issued to celebrate the 100th anniversary of British Columbia’s entry into Confederation. [436.106]
April

  • The Royal Canadian Mint announces that it will begin producing 50% silver, 50% copper dollar coins, intended only for sale to collectors, for $3 each. [2] [152.18]

1972

March 24

  • The Finance Minister announces that a 1972 silver dollar will be issued, featuring the canoe design on the reverse. [377.196]

1973

January 26

  • Olympic organizer Louis de Chantigny unveils plans for a proposal to market commemorative Olympic coins for the 1976 Summer Olympic games in Montreal, Quebec. The 4-year series of $5 and $10 silver coins, and $100 gold coins, will be issued to collectors to help fund the Olympic games. [1] [59.959]
February 2

  • The government approves special coins for the 1976 Montreal Olympics. [59.967]
February

  • Initial meetings are held at the Royal Canadian Mint to discuss producing coins for the 1976 Olympic Games. [172.232]
June 8

  • Bill C-196 is introduced in the House of Commons to permit striking Olympic commemorative coins. [59.1032] [379.10] [569.12]
(month unknown)

  • The Royal Canadian Mint obtains equipment for producing Proof coins. [661.225] [614.7]
July 27

  • Parliament and the Senate approve Bill C-196, allowing the production and sale of commemorative coins to help fund the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal. [59.1053] [379.10] [543.41] [569.1] (July 17 [569.16]) (August [549.1])
August 25

  • Assistant Deputy Postmaster Garth Campbell announces details of the $450 million commemorative coin issues planned for the 1976 Montreal Olympic Games. 28 coins are to be issued with face values of $5 and $10. [378]
August

  • Design work is completed on the first series of Olympic silver coins. [172.232]
(month unknown)

  • At the American Numismatic Association convention in Boston, Massachussettes, Postmaster General André Ouellet outlines details of the Canadian 1976 Olympic coin program. [550.1]
September 19

  • Postmaster General André Ouellet holds a news conference to unveil the first series of designs for commemorative coins for the 1976 Olympic Games. [378.278]
November 14

  • In the minting facility of the Royal Canadian Mint in Hull, Quebec, Postmaster General André Ouellet strikes the first $5 coin for the 1976 Olympic Coin Program. [45.12] [551.28]
(month unknown)

  • After the first few Olympic coins are produced, it is discovered that there should be no “th” or “e” after “XXI”. The coins and dies are destroyed. [551.1]
December 11

  • André Ouellet launches the Canadian Olympic Coin Program. [379.7] [569.14]
December 12

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins accepting orders for the first series of the Olympic commemorative $5 and $10 silver coins. [1] [59.1125] [379.8] [554.1] (December 13 [661.277] [346.84])
December

  • The Canadian Olympic Coin Program is launched in Japan. [379.158]

1974

  • In Toronto, Ontario, the Royal Canadian Mint unveils the design of the 1974 silver dollar coin, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba. [553.1]
March 1

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins marketing Olympic coins in Europe. [554.1]
(month unknown)

  • In New York, Postmaster General André Ouellet launches the Olympic Coin Program in the United States. [533.33] [554.17]
April

  • Finance Minister John Turner announces a design competition for the 1975 $1 coin to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the City of Calgary, Alberta. Closing date for submissions is July 31. First prize is $2000. [379.156] [534.1]
(month unknown)

  • The Olympic Coin Committee informs coin dealers that production of 1974-dated Olympic coins would be reduced, prices would increase, and silver composition would be dropped from 0.925 to 0.5 fine. [535.4]
June

  • The Olympic Coin Program announces that Series II coins will be higher in price, due to the rising cost of silver. [379.308]
(month unknown)

  • Due to the rising cost of silver, the Olympic Coin Program decides not to release Series II coins to circulation. [379.308]
July 11

  • The Olympic Coin Program offers members of numismatic associations in Canada the opportunity to purchase one each of all 28 Olympic coins. [379]
August

  • Two new Proof coining presses are added to the Numismatic Division in the Royal Canadian Mint’s Hull facility. [569.44]
(month unknown)

  • Postmaster General Bryce Mackasey announces a design competition for Series V Olympic coins, open to all Canadian residents. Four finalists will receive $1500, and the winner will receive an extra $1500. Closing date for entries is November 30. [379.310]
September 16

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins selling the second series of Olympic commemorative $5 and $10 silver coins. [346.88] [379.353] [557.1] [661.278] [1022.80] [1081.72]
(month unknown)

  • A major error is discovered in one of the 1973 Olympic $10 coins, with the wrong obverse with the 1974 date. The error is limited to a single die, resulting in 8-10,000 coins produced. [540.1]
  • Postmaster General Bryce Mackasey announces an international design competition for Series VI of the 1976 Olympic coins. Four finalists will receive $1500 each. Each winning coin design is worth $2000 to the designer. Closing date for entries is March 31. [380.68] [541.1]

1975

January 17

  • In Montreal, Vancouver, Winnipeg, Calgary, and Toronto, Series III Olympic coin designs are unveiled. Mintage is limited to 5 million coins. Designs are by Ken Danby, depicting cycling, rowing, lacrosse, and canoeing. [542.1] [543.1]
January 20

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins accepting orders for the third series of Olympic coins. [88.11]
July 11

  • A bill passes in Parliament authorizing the production of special gold coins to provide revenue for the 1976 Olympic Summer Games. Two coins would be produced, a 22K Proof coin, and a 14K uncirculated quality coin, both with $100 face value. [567.4] [1066.36] (July 30 [60.1416])
July 16

  • At the CNA convention, Master of the Mint Yvon Gariepy announces that a commemorative $1 coin for 1976 would mark the 100th anniversary of the completion of the Library of Parliament. He also announces two Olympic gold coins for 1976, and a silver $1 coin for 1978 commemorating the Commonwealth games in Edmonton. [380.311] [566.38]
August 8

  • The Olympic Coin Design Committee selects the design for Olympic $100 gold coins. [567.4]
  • In Montreal, Inter-Exchange Inc. holds an unofficial launch of the Series IV Olympic coins, before the official launch. The company had obtained coins from dealers in Europe, where coins had been sent in preparation for the official launch. [567.4]
August 12

  • In Toronto, Inter-Exchange again holds a press conference to show the Series IV Olympic coins, prior to the official launch. [567.4]
  • In Toronto, Bryce Mackesey, Postmaster General and minister responsible for the Olympic Coin Program, officially launches Series IV $5 and $10 silver Olympic coins. The coins depict Olympic track and field sports. The coins will be available for sale after September 1. [661.280] [346.96] [567.1] [569.1]
September 2

  • Series IV Olympic coins to go on sale at banks, dealers, and other retail outlets. [567.10]
September

  • A television commercial airs in the United States, promoting the Canadian Olympic coins. [569.23]
December 1

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins selling the fifth set of Olympic commemorative $5 and $10 silver coins. [661.281] [346.100]

1976

March 1

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins selling the sixth set of Olympic commemorative $5 and $10 silver coins. [661.282] [346.104]
March

  • Postmaster General Bryce Mackesey unveils the designs of the Series VII Olympic $5 and $10 coins, designed by Elliott Morrison. The coins will be available for sale on June 1. [572.1]
  • Gross sales of the 1976 Olympic silver coins is reported as nearly $200 million, and net profits near $50 million. [152.19] [572.1]
April 1

  • In Ottawa, the Olympic $100 gold coin is launched. Governor-General Jules Leger presents the first Proof $100 gold to Kathy Kreiner, gold medal winner in slalom at Innsbruck. The coin was designed by Dora de Pedery-Hunt. The 22K proof coin will be sold by special reservation by those who have purchased the 28 silver Olympic coins. The 14K uncirculated version is to go on sale June 15. [5] [574.1]
April 15

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins sales of the Proof 1976 Olympic 22-karat gold $100 coin; issue price is $150. [575.4] [1105.77]
June 1

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins selling the seventh and final set of Olympic commemorative $5 and $10 silver coins. [661.283] [346.108]
June 15

  • The official release price of $105 for the 14K $100 Olympic gold coin and $150 for the 22K version expires, allowing coin dealers to sell remaining inventory at free market prices. [575.4] [579.4]
(month unknown)

  • Canadian gold producers approach the Government with the concept of putting gold production to use in coinage beyond the limited production $100 collector coins. [692.B12]
September 30

  • Revenue from sale of Olympic coins to date: $371 million, net profit: $110 million. [595.78]
October

  • The 1976 Olympic Coin Program is terminated. [606.1]

1977

March

  • The Royal Canadian Mint unveils the design for the 1977 silver dollar, commemorating the silver jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II. [152.19]
April

  • 26 Canadian artists are invited to design a $100 gold coin reverse to commemorate the Queen’s 25th anniversary of rule. [588.1]
(month unknown)

  • The design for the 1977 $100 gold coin is selected. The design by Raymond Lee depicts the official flowers of the provinces and territories. [588.1]
May

  • A Proclamation authorizes the Royal Canadian Mint to strike a $100 22K gold Proof coin to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II. [387.391]
May 17

  • The Royal Canadian Mint announces the 1977 gold $100 coin, to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the accession to the throne by Queen Elizabeth II. The 22-karat 0.917 fine 1/2-ounce gold coin with be struck in Proof, with maximum mintage of 180,000, and priced at $140. [692.B1]
August 4

  • At the CNA convention in Vancouver, and in Ottawa, the Royal Canadian Mint unveils the 1977 $100 gold coin. Maximum mintage is set for 300,000. The coin will be available for purchase from September to December, at $140. [207.2] [588.1] [591.1] [593.6]
September

  • The Royal Canadian Mint begins selling the 1 ounce 1977 $100 gold collector coins. [588.1] (June [250.5])
  • The Mining Association of Canada approaches the Minister of Finance with the idea of Canada producing a gold bullion coin. The proposed name is the Beaver, and its purpose is to compete with South Africa’s Kruggerand coin in world gold sales. The idea is turned down. [270.B14] [274.29] [399.14] [590.1]
December 2

  • The Minister of State for Fitness and Amateur Sports, Iona Campagnola, announces that the 1978 silver dollar will commemorate the 11th Commonwealth Games in Edmonton. The coin’s reverse design was created by Raymond Taylor. The coins are to go on sale in February for $4.50. [208.52] [388.16] [601.1]

1978

April 21

  • A bill receives second reading in the House of Commons. It seeks to limit legal tender status of gold coins to one coin per payment over $100, and to give Cabinet power over production of gold coins. [607.1]
(month unknown)

  • Supply Minister Jean-Pierre Goyer announces plans for a $100 gold Unity coin to be available in September. The coin would be the first in a series of $100 gold coins, each with its own theme. [607.1]
May 8

  • The House of Commons gives third and final reading to a bill regarding gold coins. It allows a $100 gold national unity coin in the fall. It also allows other coins to be struck in future years, without requiring parliamentary approval. It also relaxes the restriction that a gold coin must contain enough gold to cover its face value. [61.1944] [172.250] [265.B2] [608.1]
July

  • The government authorizes the Royal Canadian Mint to produce 200,000 commemorative $100 gold coins in 1978. [266.B7]
July 20

  • Supply Minister Jean-Pierre Goyer unveils the new 1978 $100 national unity gold coin in Ottawa. Issue price will be $150. Mintage is limited to 200,000 coins. The design was created by Roger Savage. [61.1987] [268.B1] [610.1] [615.1] [1035.40]
  • Supply Minister Jean-pierre Goyer announces plans for the Royal Canadian Mint to strike gold bullion coins to compete with South Africa’s Kruggerand coin. [610.1]
July

  • At the Canadian Numismatic Association convention, Master of the Royal Canadian Mint Yvon Gariepy announces that the 1979 $100 gold coin would mark the Year of the Child, and the $1 silver coin would commemorate 300th anniversary of the first commercial ship on the Great Lakes. [611.1]
December 13

  • A proclamation sets the design of the 1979 $100 gold coin, commemorating the International Year of the Child. [106.15]
  • A proclamation sets the design of the 1979 silver $1 coin, commemorating the 300th anniversary of the first ship to sail the Great Lakes above Niagara Falls. [106.17]
Year

  • The Royal Canadian Mint struck 3,479,472 Canadian numismatic coins during the year. [616.26]

1979

February

  • The Cabinet authorizes minting of gold bullion coins for sale on the world market commencing in September. [267.B16]
February 20

  • A proclamation amends the Currency and Exchange Act, authorizing the issue of $50 gold bullion coins, with diameter of 30mm, weight of 481.25 grains, and fineness 999.5, effective March 1, 1979. [108.1154]
February 23

  • The Supply Minister announces in the House of Commons that Canada will produce bullion gold pieces, called Maple Leaf coins, for a three-year trial period. The coins will contain one ounce of gold, and have a face value of $50. [62.2090] [172.252] [274.29] [331]
(month unknown)

  • Supply and Services Minister Pierre De Bane announces the 1979 $100 gold coin, to honor the International Year of the Child. The 22k gold coin is to be available in May. [617.1]
  • Supply and Services Minister Pierre De Bane announces the 1979 $1 silver coin, to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the first voyage by a commercial ship, the Griffon, on the Great Lakes. The 0.500 fine silver coin is to be available in March. [617.1]
  • Supply and Services Minister Pierre De Bane and the President of the Board of Economic Development Ministers, R.K. Andras, announce that a gold bullion coin would be produced by the Royal Canadian Mint. The Gold Maple Leaf would have a face value of $50, and contain one troy ounce of 0.999 fine gold. The gold bullion program is set for three years, with 1 million coins produced in the first year, to be officially launched in September. [19.1]
April 5

  • A proclamation removes the limitation of 200,000 coins minted for the 1979 $100 gold coin issue. [107.1548]
September 5

  • The Royal Canadian Mint launches the gold Maple Leaf bullion coin program. A 1-ounce coin with .999 purity and $50 face value goes on sale in Canada, the U.S. and Europe. [1] [8] [62.2195] [71.2] [152.19] [209.B1] [429.1] [637.1] [1020.38] [1053.56] [1126.42] (September 1 [258.28]) (September 6 [67.684] [169.853] [269.B11]) (September 9? [56])
September

  • The Royal Canadian Mint places a limitation on orders of $1 silver coins to five coins per order. [625.8]
  • The Royal Canadian Mint temporarily stops filling orders for $1 silver coins, pending a price review, due to the increased cost of purchasing silver. [625.1,8]
  • The Royal Canadian Mint changes the price of the 1979 silver $1 coin from $5.50 to $10.80. This is the first time that the issue price of a collector item is changed during its issue. The change is due to the soaring price of silver. [17.1] [210.9]
December 12

  • Master of the Royal Canadian Mint Yvon Gariepy announces the design of the 1980 silver $1 coin, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the transfer of Arctic territories from England to Canada. The design was created by Donald Paterson. [24.1] [25.1] [389.79]
  • Master of the Royal Canadian Mint Yvon Gariepy announces the design of the 1980 gold $100 coin, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the transfer of Arctic territories from England to Canada. The design was created by Arnaldo Marchetti. [389.79] [25.1]
December 13

  • A proclamation sets the design for the 1980 silver $1 coin, featuring a polar bear on an ice floe, effective January 1, 1980. [109.3]
  • A proclamation changes the weight of the $50 gold bullion coin to 480.71 grains, with fineness 999.9, effective January 1, 1980. [109.5]
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1965-1979 1980-1989 1990-1994 1995-1997 1998-1999 2000-2002 2003-2004 2005 2006 2007
2008 2009-2010 2011-end
A list of references to all source material is available.